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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    1

    Default Network+ Study Guide errata?

    Hello... This isn't the right place for this post, but there is no better.

    I just bought the _CompTIA Network+ Study Guide_, and although I am enjoying it so far I've found a couple of errors. Typos happen, of course... but what is of concern to me is that there is no mention of this book anywhere here in these forums/on lammle.com, and even the errata pages listed in the textbook are wrong/missing! [The book states "To find up-to-the-minute updates for this chapter, please see www.lammle.com or www.sybex.com/go/comptianetwork+ ."]

    Where is the errata for this book? Am I just being impatient, and nothing has been posted yet? Perhaps a page stating such could be posted at the above-mentioned sybex link?

    Thanks...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    2,186

    Default compTIA Network+

    Thanks for writing.
    There is no URL or links because there is no errata.
    Your posting will be the first.
    Ethernet, UTP, can go 328 feet, 100 meters. I accediently wrote 228 feet somehow. Thanks for catching that!
    The link will be up this week.
    Let me know if you have any other questions.
    Cheers!
    Todd Lammle

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    36

    Default Typos

    I too have noticed a number of typos. For the most part they do not seem to prevent understanding of the material. Prior to chapter 8 (where I am now) the biggest confusion I found was in reference to wiring standards 268A (Straight through) and 268B (Crossover) is mistyped as 286A & 286B.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    2,186

    Default CompTAI Network+ Study Guide

    I wouldn't use the words "a lot of typos" as that is a huge book and the documents change a lot of hands before the book gets printed, which can create problems in itself.

    Also, since I use Microsoft Word, it has the tendency to change words it "thinks" I meant to write and I don't always catch all those.

    I read all my books dozens of time and you can never see your own errors it appears. And, well, I just make typos because I have to write so fast. It's hard not too.

    With that said, I welcome constructive criticism on this forum, as this is the reason I opened this free, public forum - to help people reading my books connect directly to me and get answers to their questions.

    I agree that I typed 586 when I meant to write 568A or 568B. Ironically, 586A and 586B also happen to also be a wiring standard - go figure!

    What you need to know is that 568A is a straight through cable and 568B is a cross over cable. The book just went to reprint and I fixed all of these errros. The CompTIA objectives only cover the 568 standards.

    Cheers!
    Todd Lammle

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    36

    Default Sorry

    I did not mean to be impolite or critical. I have sent 8 or 10 messages to the Wiley web site regarding typos. Should I send any further findings to you hear or continue posting them to the Wiley site?
    Last edited by frankenpaper; 07-04-2009 at 04:50 PM. Reason: to be more complete.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    2,186

    Default no problem!

    You weren't being impolite or critical, thank you for your post. The stupid forum made the word "critical" look larger for some reason. Go figure!!

    I am not sure if I got your corrections or not from Wiley, I probably did.
    I know that I fixed a hell of a lot of pages that had 586 instead of 568 listed, amoung other errors.

    Please, by all means, send me what you have so I can get them fixed and/or clarify them for you!!

    Cheers!
    Todd Lammle

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    36

    Default typos

    Thank you for accepting feedback so graciously. It will take some time to condense my posts to Wiley but I will get to that as soon as I can. In the mean time I am puzzling over page 280 question 13. I suspect there is a typo in the figure.

    The answer on page 284 says that the masks do not match and need to be changed to 255.255.255.0, but the masks in the figure DO match. Both read 255.255.255.240 .

    The book, PDF and Test engine all contain the same apparent error.

    ConpTIA Network+ Study Guide by Todd Lammie
    ISBN 978-0-470-42747-7
    CD ID #MD04021A
    PART #K-PART02860

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    2,186

    Default network+ study guide

    The subnets do not match, wiht a 240 mask, the hosts are in different subnets, so the best answer, given the answers we can choose from is that the masks are wrong and were meant to be /24's. That is the only way those hosts can communicate.
    Todd

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    36

    Default

    I see. I guess I did not read the and understand the question and answer correctly. I did not think of them as being on different subnets. Thank you.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    36

    Default My Wiley Posts

    The following is a compilation of the questions I posted on the Wiley site. First let me apologize for the extreme length of the following. Apparently I am very verbose in my questions. I am only trying to be clear and complete, but I do seem to go on a bit. Second I want to apologize if some of my words seem harsh, I was frustrated at the time of the posts and was not receiving what I had thought were useful responses. I have edited some of the posts below, but not most.

    ConpTIA Network+ Study Guide by Todd Lammie
    ISBN 978-0-470-42747-7
    CD ID #MD04021A
    PART #K-PART02860
    *************** *************** *
    Page 208
    Chapter 6
    Question 8
    What layer 4 protocol is used for the a Telnet connection, and what is the default port number?
    A) IP,6
    B) TCP, 21
    C) UDP, 23
    D) ICMP, 21
    E) TCP, 23

    In the book and the PDF, Page 211 says the answer is E) Telnet and correctly explains that TCP at the Transport layer with the default por number 23.
    However the test engine on the CD says B) TCP, 21
    but explains Telnet uses TCP at the Transport layer with a default port number of 23.

    Question Ticket # 090620-000061
    *************** *************** *
    Chapter 3
    Page 64
    Within the Note section, the 2nd sentence says:
    "Thick-net was known as RG-58 A/U."
    However the following page (page 65) says RG-58 A/U is for Thin net 10Base-2
    and page 66 says RG-8 is for Thicknet 10Base-5

    The text of the CD is the same.

    Question Ticket # 090623-000045
    *************** *************** *
    586 vs 568

    Search Results for 586
    Pages 77, 87, 88, 89, 92, 93, 94, 95, 655, 788
    Search Results for 568
    Pages xiv, xxxviii, 62, 77, 78, 93, 704, 724, 791, 796, 827

    Question Ticket # 090624-000001
    I got your response on this one through the Wiley site stating that this was a dyslexic error and will be corrected. So I will not quote it all here.

    However I am still unclear on one detail. Is there a 586 standard in addition to the 568 standard.
    *************** *************** *
    There is a simple sentence syntax error on:
    Page 149
    Under the heading:
    Load Balancer
    4th paragraph
    2nd Sentence
    says in part:
    ...rate at which that they come in...
    But should probably read
    ...rate at which they come in...

    Question Ticket # 090627-000021
    *************** *************** *
    Chapter 6
    Page 210
    Question 17
    says:
    What layer in the IP stack is equivalent to the Transport layer of the OSI model?
    A. Application
    B. Host-to-Host
    C. Internet
    D. Network Access

    Page 212
    Answer 17
    says:
    B. The four layers of the IP stack (also called the DoD model) are Application/Process, Host-to-Host, Internet, and Network Access. The Host-to-Host layer is equivalent to the Transport layer of the OSI model.

    Page 180
    Note
    says:
    When the different protocols in the IP stack are discussed, the layers of the OSI and DoD models are interchangeable .

    Page 192
    contains the term IP Stack in reference to UDP

    But apart from the answer on page 212, there is nothing in chapter 6 that claims that the IP stack is actual called the DoD model. Based on having read the chapter and done a fair bit of research on the internet, the only place that states that the "IP stack" is AKA DoD model.
    According to my understanding of the book so far, IP is in layer 3, (the Network layer of the OSI model and the Internet layer of the DoD model) and not a description of the model itself.

    As a result I would think that Question 17 should read:
    What layer of the DoD model is equivalent to the Transport layer of the OSI model?
    Answer: Host-to-Host

    If my understanding is flawed, please explain why, and explain the IP stack.
    Thank you for your time and attention.

    P.S.The question in the test engine on the CD is worded and answered the same way.

    Question Ticket # 090701-000027
    *************** *************** *
    Chapter 6
    Page 206
    Written Lab
    Question 3
    Says:
    What two well-known port numbers does a DNS server use?
    The answer on page 213 says:
    A DNS server uses TCP port 53 for zone transfers and UDP port 53 for name resolutions.

    Also
    Page 210
    Question 20
    Says:
    Which of the following protocols uses both TCP and UDP?
    A. FTP
    B. SMTP
    C. Telnet
    D. DNS
    The answer on Page 212 says:
    DNS uses TCP for zone exchanges between servers and UDP when a client is trying to resolve a hostname to an IP address.

    Page 188 talks about DNS but does not mention "TCP" or "UDP", nor does it relate them to "Zone Transfers" or "Name Resolution".
    Page 191 talks about TCP and says it "resolves hostnames" but does not mention "Zone Transfers". (Remember that the answer to Question 3 says that UDP is for "Name Resolution" and not TCP.)
    Page 192 talks about UDP but does not mention "Zone Transfers" or "Name Resolution"
    Page 194 does have a chart that lists DNS port 53 under the heading of both TCP and UDP. But does not relate them to "Zone Transfers" or "Name Resolution".
    Page 203
    Paragraph 4
    Last sentence contains the only other reference to DNS that I found in Chapter 6, which says:
    "...was discovered through name resolution method at the upper layers __ probably DNS..."
    To me this is hardly a declarative statement indicating a true fact, but a simple probability.

    Does DNS name resolution use TCP or UDP?

    And will you please relay this to the author/publisher so they can clarify this subject before the next printing?

    Question Ticket # 090701-000057
    *************** *************** *
    Chapter 6
    Page 209
    Question 7 says:
    What UNIX command is used for terminal emulation in the same way as Telnet is used?

    Page 213
    Answer 7 says:
    The UNIX command rlogin functions similarly to Telnet.

    Page 185
    Under the heading
    Secure Shell (SSH)
    The last sentence says:
    You can think of it as the new-generation protocol that's now used in place of rsh and rlogin -- even Telent.
    Chapter 6 makes no other reference that I can find to rlogin or that it is a Unix command.

    The first time the book mentions Unix and rlogin in the same paragraph isn't until
    Page 531
    Under the heading
    rsh
    which says :
    Like many other legacy commands, remote shell (rsh) originated int he Unix world. It was released as a part of the rlogin package in 1983 with version 4.2BSD. rsh is defined in RFC 1258 with rlogin and runs on TCP port 514.

    I believe that if the reader is expected to be able to answer a test question the information refering to that question should appear sometime before the question is asked, not after.

    Question Ticket # 090701-000234
    *************** *************** *
    Page 232
    Question 4
    says:
    What does the IP Properties selection Obtain an IP Address Automatically indicate?

    Where in chapter 7 (or before) was this discussed?
    I did a search in the PDF file and did not come up with anything related prior to the question itself.

    Question Ticket # 090702-000161

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    36

    Default My Wiley Posts Continued

    *************** *************** *
    Below I try to explain why I think there are Errors on pages 252, 253, 254, 259, 263

    In each section below I try to show examples of information being displayed consistently and correctly followed by examples of inconsistent, typographical or syntax errors.

    Chapter 8
    Subnetting Practice examples: Class C Addresses

    - Consistent pattern.
    Page 249
    Part of Practice Example #1C: 255.255.255.128 (/25)
    What are the valid subnets? 256 - 128 = 128. Blah, blah, blah. 0, 128.
    Page 250
    Part of Practice Example #2C: 255.255.255.192 (/26)
    What are the valid subnets? 256 - 192 = 64. Blah, blah, blah. 0, 64, 128, and 192.
    Page 251
    Part of Practice Example #3C: 255.255.255.224 (/27)
    What are the valid subnets? 256 - 224 = 32. Blah, blah, blah. 0, 32, 64, 96, 128, 160, 192, and 224.

    - Inconsistent (Not wrong, but seems out of place.)
    Page 252
    Part of Practice Example #4C: 255.255.255.240 (/2
    What are the valid subnets? 256 - 240 = 16. Blah, blah, blah. Start at 0: 0 + 12 = 16. 16 + 16 = 32. 32 + 16 = 48. 48 + 16 = 64...( this list just seemed out of place to show the math of adding 16 to each number rather than listing 0, 16, 32, 48, 64 etc. as in the previous examples. It's not wrong, just odd in context, since we have already established in the first 3 examples that we are adding the difference between 256 and the subnet to 0 and the next result until we reach the subnet.)

    - Typographical or syntax error.
    Page 252
    Part of Practice Example #5C: 255.255.255.248 (/29)
    Valid subnets? 256 - 248 = 0, 8, 16, 24, 32...
    I believe that you intended for this to read:
    Valid subnets? 256 - 248 = 8. 0, 8, 16, 24, 32...

    - Inconsistent (Not wrong)
    Page 253
    Part of Practice Example #6C: 255.255.255.252 (/30)
    I have to assume that you decided not to show any math at all on this one, in preparation for the next section "Subnetting in your head: Class C addresses". I just thought that since I was bringing so much to your attention in this chapter I did not want to leave it out.
    ------------------------------
    Subnetting in Your Head: Class C Addresses

    - Consistent pattern.
    Page 254
    1st paragraph
    starting with the 2nd sentence
    256 - 224 = 32. 0, 32, 64.
    2nd paragraph
    starting with the 2nd sentence
    256 - 240 = 16. 0, 16, 32, 46.
    3rd paragraph
    starting in the first sentence
    256 - 240 = 16. Blah, blah, blah. 0, 16, 32, 48, 64...

    - Typographical or syntax error.
    Page 254
    4th paragraph
    2nd sentence
    256 - 252 = 0 (blah, blah, blah) 4, 8, 16...
    I believe that you intended for this to read:
    256 - 252 = 4. 0 (blah, blah, blah) 4, 8, 16...
    ------------------------------
    Subnetting Practice Examples: Class B Addresses

    - Consistent pattern.
    Page 258
    Part of Practice Example #1B: 255.255.128.0 (/17)
    Valid subnets? 256 - 128 = 128. 0, 128
    Page 258
    Part of Practice Example #2B: 255.255.192.0 (/1
    Valid subnets? 256 - 192 = 64. 0, 64, 128, 192.

    - Typographical or syntax error.
    Page 259
    Part of Practice Example #3B: 255.255.240.0 (/20)
    Valid subnets? 256 - 240 = 0, 16, 32, 48...
    I believe that you intended for this to read:
    Valid subnets? 256 - 240 = 16. 0, 16, 32, 48...
    Page 260
    Part of Practice Example #4B: 255.255.254.0 (/23)
    Valid subnets? 256 - 254 = 0, 2, 4, 6...
    I believe that you intended for this to read:
    Valid subnets? 256 - 254 = 2. 0, 2, 4, 6...
    ------------------------------
    Subnetting in Your Head: Class B Addresses

    - Consistent pattern.
    Page 263
    Contained in Part 1.
    256 - 224 = 32. 32 + 32 = 64.
    Page 263
    Contained in Part 2.
    256 - 192 = 64. 0, 64, 128.

    - Typographical or syntax error.
    Page 263
    Contained in Part 3.
    256 - 224 = 0, 32, 64...
    I believe that you intended for this to read:
    256 - 224 = 32. 0, 32, 64...

    - Consistent pattern.
    Page 263
    Contained in Part 4.
    256 - 240 = 16. Blah, blah, blah. 0, 16, 32, 48,

    - Typographical or syntax error.
    Page 263
    Contained in Part 5.
    256 - 252 = 0, 4, 8, 12...
    I believe that you intended for this to read:
    256 - 252 = 4. 0, 4, 8, 12...
    ------------------------------

    Question Ticket # 090704-000031

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    2,186

    Default Network+ can be tricky...

    Quote Originally Posted by frankenpaper View Post
    I see. I guess I did not read the and understand the question and answer correctly. I did not think of them as being on different subnets. Thank you.

    This is why I am careful when I write the questions. The answer is correct, but apeared wrong. Terrible, but the answer, once you see it, is correct.
    Todd

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    2,186

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by frankenpaper View Post
    The following is a compilation of the questions I posted on the Wiley site. First let me apologize for the extreme length of the following. Apparently I am very verbose in my questions. I am only trying to be clear and complete, but I do seem to go on a bit. Second I want to apologize if some of my words seem harsh, I was frustrated at the time of the posts and was not receiving what I had thought were useful responses. I have edited some of the posts below, but not most.

    ConpTIA Network+ Study Guide by Todd Lammie
    ISBN 978-0-470-42747-7
    CD ID #MD04021A
    PART #K-PART02860
    *************** *************** *
    Page 208
    Chapter 6
    Question 8
    What layer 4 protocol is used for the a Telnet connection, and what is the default port number?
    A) IP,6
    B) TCP, 21
    C) UDP, 23
    D) ICMP, 21
    E) TCP, 23

    In the book and the PDF, Page 211 says the answer is E) Telnet and correctly explains that TCP at the Transport layer with the default por number 23.
    However the test engine on the CD says B) TCP, 21
    but explains Telnet uses TCP at the Transport layer with a default port number of 23.

    Question Ticket # 090620-000061
    *************** *************** *
    Chapter 3
    Page 64
    Within the Note section, the 2nd sentence says:
    "Thick-net was known as RG-58 A/U."
    However the following page (page 65) says RG-58 A/U is for Thin net 10Base-2
    and page 66 says RG-8 is for Thicknet 10Base-5

    The text of the CD is the same.

    Question Ticket # 090623-000045
    *************** *************** *
    586 vs 568

    Search Results for 586
    Pages 77, 87, 88, 89, 92, 93, 94, 95, 655, 788
    Search Results for 568
    Pages xiv, xxxviii, 62, 77, 78, 93, 704, 724, 791, 796, 827

    Question Ticket # 090624-000001
    I got your response on this one through the Wiley site stating that this was a dyslexic error and will be corrected. So I will not quote it all here.

    However I am still unclear on one detail. Is there a 586 standard in addition to the 568 standard.
    *************** *************** *
    There is a simple sentence syntax error on:
    Page 149
    Under the heading:
    Load Balancer
    4th paragraph
    2nd Sentence
    says in part:
    ...rate at which that they come in...
    But should probably read
    ...rate at which they come in...

    Question Ticket # 090627-000021
    *************** *************** *
    Chapter 6
    Page 210
    Question 17
    says:
    What layer in the IP stack is equivalent to the Transport layer of the OSI model?
    A. Application
    B. Host-to-Host
    C. Internet
    D. Network Access

    Page 212
    Answer 17
    says:
    B. The four layers of the IP stack (also called the DoD model) are Application/Process, Host-to-Host, Internet, and Network Access. The Host-to-Host layer is equivalent to the Transport layer of the OSI model.

    Page 180
    Note
    says:
    When the different protocols in the IP stack are discussed, the layers of the OSI and DoD models are interchangeable .

    Page 192
    contains the term IP Stack in reference to UDP

    But apart from the answer on page 212, there is nothing in chapter 6 that claims that the IP stack is actual called the DoD model. Based on having read the chapter and done a fair bit of research on the internet, the only place that states that the "IP stack" is AKA DoD model.
    According to my understanding of the book so far, IP is in layer 3, (the Network layer of the OSI model and the Internet layer of the DoD model) and not a description of the model itself.

    As a result I would think that Question 17 should read:
    What layer of the DoD model is equivalent to the Transport layer of the OSI model?
    Answer: Host-to-Host

    If my understanding is flawed, please explain why, and explain the IP stack.
    Thank you for your time and attention.

    P.S.The question in the test engine on the CD is worded and answered the same way.

    Question Ticket # 090701-000027
    *************** *************** *
    Chapter 6
    Page 206
    Written Lab
    Question 3
    Says:
    What two well-known port numbers does a DNS server use?
    The answer on page 213 says:
    A DNS server uses TCP port 53 for zone transfers and UDP port 53 for name resolutions.

    Also
    Page 210
    Question 20
    Says:
    Which of the following protocols uses both TCP and UDP?
    A. FTP
    B. SMTP
    C. Telnet
    D. DNS
    The answer on Page 212 says:
    DNS uses TCP for zone exchanges between servers and UDP when a client is trying to resolve a hostname to an IP address.

    Page 188 talks about DNS but does not mention "TCP" or "UDP", nor does it relate them to "Zone Transfers" or "Name Resolution".
    Page 191 talks about TCP and says it "resolves hostnames" but does not mention "Zone Transfers". (Remember that the answer to Question 3 says that UDP is for "Name Resolution" and not TCP.)
    Page 192 talks about UDP but does not mention "Zone Transfers" or "Name Resolution"
    Page 194 does have a chart that lists DNS port 53 under the heading of both TCP and UDP. But does not relate them to "Zone Transfers" or "Name Resolution".
    Page 203
    Paragraph 4
    Last sentence contains the only other reference to DNS that I found in Chapter 6, which says:
    "...was discovered through name resolution method at the upper layers __ probably DNS..."
    To me this is hardly a declarative statement indicating a true fact, but a simple probability.

    Does DNS name resolution use TCP or UDP?

    And will you please relay this to the author/publisher so they can clarify this subject before the next printing?

    Question Ticket # 090701-000057
    *************** *************** *
    Chapter 6
    Page 209
    Question 7 says:
    What UNIX command is used for terminal emulation in the same way as Telnet is used?

    Page 213
    Answer 7 says:
    The UNIX command rlogin functions similarly to Telnet.

    Page 185
    Under the heading
    Secure Shell (SSH)
    The last sentence says:
    You can think of it as the new-generation protocol that's now used in place of rsh and rlogin -- even Telent.
    Chapter 6 makes no other reference that I can find to rlogin or that it is a Unix command.

    The first time the book mentions Unix and rlogin in the same paragraph isn't until
    Page 531
    Under the heading
    rsh
    which says :
    Like many other legacy commands, remote shell (rsh) originated int he Unix world. It was released as a part of the rlogin package in 1983 with version 4.2BSD. rsh is defined in RFC 1258 with rlogin and runs on TCP port 514.

    I believe that if the reader is expected to be able to answer a test question the information refering to that question should appear sometime before the question is asked, not after.

    Question Ticket # 090701-000234
    *************** *************** *
    Page 232
    Question 4
    says:
    What does the IP Properties selection Obtain an IP Address Automatically indicate?

    Where in chapter 7 (or before) was this discussed?
    I did a search in the PDF file and did not come up with anything related prior to the question itself.

    Question Ticket # 090702-000161

    There are some typos in here and I'll go through them, even though Sybex sent this to me today as well. Thank you for this and I'll get to this as soon as I can.
    Todd

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    2,186

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by frankenpaper View Post
    *************** *************** *
    Below I try to explain why I think there are Errors on pages 252, 253, 254, 259, 263

    In each section below I try to show examples of information being displayed consistently and correctly followed by examples of inconsistent, typographical or syntax errors.

    Chapter 8
    Subnetting Practice examples: Class C Addresses

    - Consistent pattern.
    Page 249
    Part of Practice Example #1C: 255.255.255.128 (/25)
    What are the valid subnets? 256 - 128 = 128. Blah, blah, blah. 0, 128.
    Page 250
    Part of Practice Example #2C: 255.255.255.192 (/26)
    What are the valid subnets? 256 - 192 = 64. Blah, blah, blah. 0, 64, 128, and 192.
    Page 251
    Part of Practice Example #3C: 255.255.255.224 (/27)
    What are the valid subnets? 256 - 224 = 32. Blah, blah, blah. 0, 32, 64, 96, 128, 160, 192, and 224.

    - Inconsistent (Not wrong, but seems out of place.)
    Page 252
    Part of Practice Example #4C: 255.255.255.240 (/2
    What are the valid subnets? 256 - 240 = 16. Blah, blah, blah. Start at 0: 0 + 12 = 16. 16 + 16 = 32. 32 + 16 = 48. 48 + 16 = 64...( this list just seemed out of place to show the math of adding 16 to each number rather than listing 0, 16, 32, 48, 64 etc. as in the previous examples. It's not wrong, just odd in context, since we have already established in the first 3 examples that we are adding the difference between 256 and the subnet to 0 and the next result until we reach the subnet.)

    - Typographical or syntax error.
    Page 252
    Part of Practice Example #5C: 255.255.255.248 (/29)
    Valid subnets? 256 - 248 = 0, 8, 16, 24, 32...
    I believe that you intended for this to read:
    Valid subnets? 256 - 248 = 8. 0, 8, 16, 24, 32...

    - Inconsistent (Not wrong)
    Page 253
    Part of Practice Example #6C: 255.255.255.252 (/30)
    I have to assume that you decided not to show any math at all on this one, in preparation for the next section "Subnetting in your head: Class C addresses". I just thought that since I was bringing so much to your attention in this chapter I did not want to leave it out.
    ------------------------------
    Subnetting in Your Head: Class C Addresses

    - Consistent pattern.
    Page 254
    1st paragraph
    starting with the 2nd sentence
    256 - 224 = 32. 0, 32, 64.
    2nd paragraph
    starting with the 2nd sentence
    256 - 240 = 16. 0, 16, 32, 46.
    3rd paragraph
    starting in the first sentence
    256 - 240 = 16. Blah, blah, blah. 0, 16, 32, 48, 64...

    - Typographical or syntax error.
    Page 254
    4th paragraph
    2nd sentence
    256 - 252 = 0 (blah, blah, blah) 4, 8, 16...
    I believe that you intended for this to read:
    256 - 252 = 4. 0 (blah, blah, blah) 4, 8, 16...
    ------------------------------
    Subnetting Practice Examples: Class B Addresses

    - Consistent pattern.
    Page 258
    Part of Practice Example #1B: 255.255.128.0 (/17)
    Valid subnets? 256 - 128 = 128. 0, 128
    Page 258
    Part of Practice Example #2B: 255.255.192.0 (/1
    Valid subnets? 256 - 192 = 64. 0, 64, 128, 192.

    - Typographical or syntax error.
    Page 259
    Part of Practice Example #3B: 255.255.240.0 (/20)
    Valid subnets? 256 - 240 = 0, 16, 32, 48...
    I believe that you intended for this to read:
    Valid subnets? 256 - 240 = 16. 0, 16, 32, 48...
    Page 260
    Part of Practice Example #4B: 255.255.254.0 (/23)
    Valid subnets? 256 - 254 = 0, 2, 4, 6...
    I believe that you intended for this to read:
    Valid subnets? 256 - 254 = 2. 0, 2, 4, 6...
    ------------------------------
    Subnetting in Your Head: Class B Addresses

    - Consistent pattern.
    Page 263
    Contained in Part 1.
    256 - 224 = 32. 32 + 32 = 64.
    Page 263
    Contained in Part 2.
    256 - 192 = 64. 0, 64, 128.

    - Typographical or syntax error.
    Page 263
    Contained in Part 3.
    256 - 224 = 0, 32, 64...
    I believe that you intended for this to read:
    256 - 224 = 32. 0, 32, 64...

    - Consistent pattern.
    Page 263
    Contained in Part 4.
    256 - 240 = 16. Blah, blah, blah. 0, 16, 32, 48,

    - Typographical or syntax error.
    Page 263
    Contained in Part 5.
    256 - 252 = 0, 4, 8, 12...
    I believe that you intended for this to read:
    256 - 252 = 4. 0, 4, 8, 12...
    ------------------------------

    Question Ticket # 090704-000031

    Okay, there is not ONE typo in this area. I can't beleive you typed all this out! I shoudl have you write for me.
    This is the way I write. After you go through dozens of examples, the math is implied. If you read it again, it makes sense. Put the important "blah, blah, blah..." back in and it says "we always start at 0. so 256-252= 4, yes, that is true, but I just skip that and say "256-252=0, 4, 8, 12, 16" until we get to our answer.
    This is an important chapter and one you just MUST understand.
    It seems like you do understand it, well enough to write this. If you read it again, you'll understand "my style", or "voicing" some people may call it.
    Cheers!
    Todd Lammle

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    36

    Default

    I believe we agree that I understood what you meant, and as long as the pages read as you intended then I am contented. Tonight I am re-reading subnetting Class C addresses and hopefully tomorrow I will understand better when I read Troubleshooting IP Addressing. As far as writing for you, I will be more than happy to entertain any job offers you have available.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    36

    Default Very trivial typo on CD Test engine

    ConpTIA Network+ Study Guide by Todd Lammie
    ISBN 978-0-470-42747-7
    CD ID #MD04021A
    PART #K-PART02860

    The Test engine on the CD
    Chapter 8
    question 16
    Says:
    ...what would be the IP address of EO...
    Following the "E" is the capital letter "O" and not a zero.

    The PDF file and the Book are correct.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    2,186

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by frankenpaper View Post
    ConpTIA Network+ Study Guide by Todd Lammie
    ISBN 978-0-470-42747-7
    CD ID #MD04021A
    PART #K-PART02860

    The Test engine on the CD
    Chapter 8
    question 16
    Says:
    ...what would be the IP address of EO...
    Following the "E" is the capital letter "O" and not a zero.

    The PDF file and the Book are correct.
    It's just on the CD? That's odd because they basically copy/paste...
    Thanks for letting me know!
    Todd

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    36

    Default typo missing a digit

    Unless I have misunderstood the previous examples there is another typo on
    page 263
    Subnetting in Your Head: Class B Addresses
    3. What subnet and broadcasst address is the IP address 172.16.50.10 255.255.240.0 (/19) a member of?
    256 - 224 = 0, 32, 64 (remember, we always start counting at zero). The subnet is 172.16.32.0, and the broadcast must be 172.16.63.25 because 64.0 is the next subnet.

    I believe the correct broadcast address should be "172.16.63. 255"

    By the way the reason that I type things out so completely is because I am trying to make it easier on the reader, assuming that they may not have the book in front of them. I am starting to wonder since you are the author, you may have a well thumbed copy at hand. Then again being the author you may not need to refer to it at all unless someone like me is bugging you over trivial details. What works best for you?

    Please let me know at your convenience.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    36

    Default This has to be a typo

    If I have learned what you have taught me in chapter 8, then I must conclude the following is a typo or transcription error.
    page 285
    #3
    192.168.100.66/27. A /27 is 255.255.255.224 . The fourth octet is a block size of 32. Count by 32s until you pass the host address of 66. 0, 32, 64. The host is in the 32 subnet, broadcast address fof 63. The valid host range is 33-62.
    I believe it should read
    192.168.100.66/27. A /27 is 255.255.255.224 . The fourth octet is a block size of 32. Count by 32s until you pass the host address of 66. 0, 32, 64, 96. The host is in the 64 subnet, broadcast address fof 95. The valid host range is 65-94.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    36

    Default Please tell me this is a typo

    Chapter 9
    page 290
    3rd paragraph
    says:
    Just because we can, let's look at another example. Based on the output of the next routing table, which interface will a packet with a destination address of 10.10.10.14 be forwarded from?

    Surely you meant to. Otherwise it would be like saying who is allowed to write a letter to Santa Clause, based on where they live.

    The chapter is about routing, and routing is about where things (packets) go, not where they have been, right?

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